INTERNET SAFETY

INTERNET SAFETY

 

UNDERSTAND THE CHALLENGE
Youth online.

Youth are tech savvy and get most of their information and socialization through the Internet and digital devices. For them, there is no distinction between the real world and the online world – they are one in the same.

As a parent, the best way to help ensure your kid’s safety online is to become tech-savvy yourself. Think of technology as a language. Your kid has most likely spoken this language since birth and is fluent in it. You need to know the language if you want to communicate with them.

INTERNET SAFETY

 

UNDERSTAND THE CHALLENGE
Youth online.

Youth are tech savvy and get most of their information and socialization through the Internet and digital devices. For them, there is no distinction between the real world and the online world – they are one in the same.

As a parent, the best way to help ensure your kid’s safety online is to become tech-savvy yourself. Think of technology as a language. Your kid has most likely spoken this language since birth and is fluent in it. You need to know the language if you want to communicate with them.

INS AND OUTS OF INTERNET SAFETY

For anyone born after 1980, the world has always had computers and cell phones. They are tech savvy and get most of their information and socialization through the Internet. For them, there is no distinction between the real world and the online world – they are one in the same.

As a parent, the best way to help ensure your child’s safety online is to become tech savvy yourself. Think of technology as a language. Your child has spoken this language since birth and is fluent in it. You need to know the language if you want to communicate with them. Yes, technology can seem overwhelming, but this handout will help you get started by explaining the basics of technology and online safety. You’ll learn some important values to teach your child about using technology. Finally, you will find some useful online resources where you can continue your education.

  • Secretive about online activities
  • Obsessive about internet use
  • Gets angry when he/she can’t get online
  • Receives/makes phone calls from/to unknown people
  • Receives gifts and/or packages from unknown persons
  • Withdraws from family and friends
  • Risky/unhealthy relationships
  • Cyber Bullying: See bullying section
  • Downloading internet pornography
  • Depression
  • Self-injury
  • Eating disorders
  • Substance abuse
  • Changes screens or turns off computer when an adult enters a room
  • Secretive about online activities
  • Obsessive about internet use
  • Gets angry when he/she can’t get online
  • Receives/makes phone calls from/to unknown people
  • Receives gifts and/or packages from unknown persons
  • Withdraws from family and friends
  • Risky/unhealthy relationships
  • Cyber Bullying: See bullying section
  • Downloading internet pornography
  • Depression
  • Self-injury
  • Eating disorders
  • Substance abuse
  • Changes screens or turns off computer when an adult enters a room

PARENT GUIDE

Ask your kids about the amplif(i) presentations they saw at school.
What choices did the speaker make that they can or cannot relate to, what did they learn?

Tell your kids what your family’s position is on internet safety.
Talk to your spouse, agree on your family’s position, and share that with your kid. Make that position very clear and always remain consistent, don’t waiver.

Attend one of our adult education presentations.
Discuss with your kid what you have learned about internet safety.

Create and follow consistent rules for internet use.
Include sites that they can and cannot visit and which social media sites and apps are acceptable. Set privacy settings on social media sites appropriately and monitor who they are linked with in the digital world. Regulate how much time they can spend online, discuss where they can access the internet, and remember to set log off times.

Model appropriate online behavior for your kid.
As parents we have the ability to model life skills like conflict resolution, maintaining positive and safe online relationships, and how to take intentional breaks from technology.

Create opportunities for two-way conversation about the internet.
This is a great opportunity to role-play correct responses to online threats and to simply listen to what your kid faces online.

Educate yourself.
Technology is constantly changing In order to be a reliable resource for your kid, be able to identify current online trends and dangers as well as warning signs for identity theft, cyber-bullying, sexual solicitation, and sexting.

Deter negative behavior online.
Take planned action to lock your kid’s credit report, use browsing settings to block dangerous websites, “friend” your kid on their social media sites (be aware that youth usually have multiple social media accounts), and use computer monitoring software to help deter behavior.

Teen Lifeline

602-248-TEEN (8336)
Or toll free at
1-800-248-TEEN (8336)

Community Information and Referral Services

602-263-8856
(1-800-352-3792
within area codes 520 and 928)

Maricopa 24-Hour Crisis Hotline

602-222-9444
Across Arizona
1-800-631-1314

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